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in the middle of discussing the general election and when all the power went out. we're hoping it isn't quite as difficult as one. we are sorry jeanne could be with us but we're fortunate to have represented schwarz with as representing a dish in philadelphia, and urban philadelphia, vice ranking democratic member on the committee on the ways and means committee. i want to have a conversation, that reflects kind of the dual nature of the to do list that the public can send it in the pulpit on the one hand when you ask them the most immediate challenge in washington today, with the most wanted ashington to do, they to talk about deficit or the debt, getting the fiscal house in order. but that is not the full extent. right behind that is education, retirement, good paying jobs with very different by the way, talk about priorities along partisan and racial lines. let's start with where we are and where the public not surprisingly is on the question of solving the immediate fiscal cliff decision. how would you describe your feeling that there will be some kind of accommodation deals these on the
social media sites. >> next, kevin matson recounts the presidential election of 1952 and richard nixon's "checkers" speech delivered on national television on september 23rd, 1952. the speech was given in response to allegations that nixon miss use political donations. the author recounts nixon's usage of the family dog checkers to denote his everyman status and saves his vice-presidential nomination. this program is about an hour. >> before we begin it is okay to come up closer to church, synagogue or a moth. i am pleased that our friends from c-span are here, so this will be broadcast at some point suitor than later and they always do a great job and want to welcome c-span again to politics and prose. it has added to c-span has added to our civil discourse and whatever bookstores you come to they are generally independent fast and c-span is really wonderful. i want to welcome tonight at 18. we are celebrating the publication of his book "just plain dick". how many of you were around when the "checkers" speech was given? i am sure many people in the audience tonight will also th
election cycle, he was one of the strongest voices this he had would a lost our way -- that we'd lost our way in washington. jim is a kind, sincere man, an individual who is a joy to be around. when it comes to what's going on in america, jim understands that if we don't make some changes we're going to lose our way of life. that's what's driven him above all else, to try to keep our country a place to be place where you can be anything. i look forward to working with jim in the private sector. from a personal point of view, we've had a great ride together. it has been fun. it has been challenging, and i think we put south carolina on the map in different ways at different times, and to people back in south carolina, i hope if you get to see jim anytime soon, just say "thank you." because whether you agree with him or not, he was doing what he thought was best for south carolina and the united states. at the end of the day, that's as good as it gets. because if you're doing what you really believe in and you're not worried about being the most popular and people getting mad ought, then yo
as far as that road that is concerned whether it is the road map to elections as the ambassador was speaking to or a road map for the negotiations between the various disaffected elements in the north of bahrain to renounce violence and engage in an negotiations process. obviously if we get to a point of elections being held and being able to resume assistance with the forces, that will be an important step forward for the united states to be able to directly help the malian forces in addition to other contributing countries. european union, france, others have already begun to really engage with the malian forces, so it isn't as if there is an abstinence of support for them in the intervening period. >> what lessons have we learned, if i might, ms. dory and mr. gast, i think the mission just celebrated the 50th anniversary. we were actively engaged in the training a good thing as a part of the very probably democracy support and in trying to create and sustain a cultural democracy what lessons are there that we might learn going forward about political failures and more on dome
know that that kennedy's naim what the joseph p. kennedy iii who ran for the most elected in congress. now the election came before my book came out, and i was worried. i thought it was a legitimate concern in the senate. he said don't worry. he said everybody knows my father had an affair with gloria swanson, and she said i know my father was an anti-semite and what ever you find come and what ever you write is going to be true to the man i knew and loved than what is out there. so i said okay. i want full access to everything. i want full access to the family, to all of the documents, to everything that is stored at the kennedy library in boston but close to researchers, and you will see the book coming you into the family and your lawyers and representatives will see the book when it's between hard covers, and i won't be coming back to you for permission to decide anything whatever i find i'm going to use in the book. he said okay then it took 18 months to get this in writing and i was off and running. and i found a more remarkable story than i had imagined. i found the story of a
officer with occasional stints in the pentagon. in 1997, judge grimm was elected a magistrate judge by the judges of the u.s. district court for the district of maryland and in 2006 became the chief u.s. magistrate judge in baltimore. in 2009, chief justice john roberts appointed judge grimm to serve as a member of the advisory committee for the federal rules of civil procedure, and in 2010, he was designated as chair of the civil rules committee discovery subcommittee. i mention that because it's evident from the chief judge's appointment that judge grimm is a nationally recognized expert on cutting edge issues of law and technology. he has written numerous authoritative opinions, books and articles on the subject of evidence, civil procedure and trial advocacy. he also continues to inspire the next generation of lawyers by teaching classes at both of our law schools, and on several occasions, professor grimm has been awarded the title of outstanding magistrate faculty member. that's as a magistrate judge, he has been able to find time not only to teach but to be an outstanding pro
who could just not sit quietly, who had to take up the cause. in the 2010 election cycle, he was one of the strongest voices this he had would a lost our way -- that we'd lost our way in washington. jim is a kind, sincere man, an individual who is a joy to be around. when it comes to what's going on in america, jim understands that if we don't make some changes we're going to lose our way of life. that's what's driven him above all else, to try to keep our country a place to be place where you can be anything. i look forward to working with jim in the private sector. from a personal point of view, we've had a great ride together. it has been fun. it has been challenging, and i think we put south carolina on the map in different ways at different times, and to people back in south carolina, i hope if you get to see jim anytime soon, just say "thank you." because whether you agree with him or not, he was doing what he thought was best for south carolina and the united states. at the end of the day, that's as good as it gets. because if you're doing what you really believe in and you're
is the uncool thing important to win an election? the reason people like barack obama is because he is cool. he is a community activist, an organizer. how did that happen? because it's cool. the culture embraces fake coolness over real achievement. kids would rather play faster not been actually be one or being an actor than actually doing something but i will say this. there is a really big bright spot in president obama being reelected. if he had lost he would be back for another four years and he would be 45% more gray which makes him more -- [inaudible] so we are uncool. that is the way the are. that is how we are. i don't believe that. i look at our message. what is our message? we like to build things. making things as cool. nothing wrong with that. we like be like to own stuff. competition is awesome. the liberal view is self-esteem is better. is better to build self-esteem without competition. that doesn't work. the highest incidence of self-esteem can be found in prison. i think i made that up. it's one of those things that you read and he repeated over and over again but if you ever m
. from 1980 until this year when a lame duck session followed a presidential election, every single judicial nominee reported with bipartisan judicial committee support has been confirmed. that's whether it was a republican or democratic president or republican-controlled or democratic-controlled senate. according to the nonpartisan congressional research service, no consensus nominee reported prior to the august recess has ever been denied a vote before now. somehow this president is treated differently than all the other presidents before it. it had been here with president ford, president carter, president reagan, first president bush, president clinton, second president bush, now president obama. none of those other presidents were treated in the way this president is treated. it's something senate democrats have never done in a lame duck session, whether after a presidential or midterm election. in fact, the senate democrats allowed votes on 20 of president george w. bush's judicial nominees, including three circuit court nominees in the lame duck session after the election in
can -- and i hope it can begin in the wake of this election season -- implementing a series of pro-democracy political reforms. and second, to building a unified and powerful progressive movement on the ground. so the final chapters of the book describe what's necessary, i think, in these areas. and they set out an agenda for political reform, and they describe at least some aspects of the movement that must be built. so let me stress two things. our various progressive communities today, in my view, are still -- are too fragmented and to an unfortunate degree in our silos. and if we remain that way, we're not going to be able to take advantage of the positive opportunities that are opening up by the rising disenchantment with the current order and by ongoing crises which will surely recur. so what we need for starters is a unified, progressive identity, concerted efforts to institutionalize coordination among all the progressive communities, a common infrastructure capable of formulating clear policy objectives and strategic messages and a commitment to creating a powerful, unifie
is simply a process. you had an election. he took a bow for their own enslavement and often do. people forget this. they think world for freedom. i'm sorry, but there's a constituency that is per submission. this is a site goes fact of life that is not fully appreciated. in the west. so how do you go about it? to distinguish between democracy and liberalism and you try as best you can to promote the spirit of liberalism, even if it is procedurally at the expense of the brotherhood. >> your response to that? >> i'm listening to this discussion which i enjoy thoroughly, but my mind as to how we do this. and i would throw home one point that i'm trying to stress here that i may agree or disagree with some of the things said. the problem in washington is you look at the democracy, freedom and liberal promotion mechanisms we have. they're actually not as nimble as they need to be. i look at benghazi and answers questions about the talking points, but the bigger policy deployed when he set up is how do we influence the next faith? ambassador chris stevens who is killed to honor his memory. r
the election to increase the health budget in 2010-11 and a tougher budget. he knows the reality. let me give him one more opportunity. he may have a promise to the british people for year on year increase in the health budget including 2010-11. he failed to meet the promise. why doesn't he just admit it? i raise the reminder that the general election was after the 2010 year, has begun. this was labor's plan and what we of the knees increased every year. if he doesn't believe that perhaps he would listen to the labor health secretary who gave an interview in the newspaper when he said this about the tories. they are not increasing it. they're increasing it. the goes on. cameron has been saying every week in the commons. the shadow health secretary wants to spend it less on health than us which is true, isn't it? he says yes, it is true. that is my point. very have it. it is the official. labor wants to cut the nhs. it would never be safe with them again. >> there, mr. speaker. the reality is -- the reality is, the reality is my right hon. friend let's a rising health benefits and this prime m
for our state. florida, you can spell it without the. and honestly, if you go to that date county election bureau official website it says election ready. it does. almost impossible this could happen. twelve years ago. everyone remembers 2000. they could not figure out which will. people of florida, if you are behind -- year in a left turn lane with and marijuana pointing left and behind a car, usually is to people in the 1998 buick. a light changes, there's a green arrow pointing left. with the flock. usually have to wait a couple of cycles. what i want to do is to make it more friendly for florida voters. instead of using words, pictures. you would go by poking under candid it's eyeballs. follow what happened, the poke up their own eyeballs. the ballot was really, really long. long questions are written by lawyers from mars. at first it was an english, and then it was in spanish. then it was in creole and then calling on. by the time you get to the yes or no part you have to go back. in .we should not have electl votes anymore. we can still have elections. we should give our electoral
believe that's the message of this election, that people want us to sit down and be reasonable and work together. they also sent a message through the reelection of our president, who campaigned, saying that the wealthiest among us should be part of solving the problem, can afford to pay a little bit more in order to make sure we're not asking middle-class families to have the entire burden of resolving the deficit in our country. the president won, the public said common sense says everybody ought to be participating, not just middle-class families and senior citizens who have been hit the hardest in the recession. everything has happened in the last decade. they have been hit the hardest on, carried the brunt of it. now we're saying, you know what? everybody ought to be in this as americans. we all benefit from this great country, the blessings of this country, and everybody ought to be a part of the solution. i believe it was a very strong message. i believe it was a very strong message to say that people want us to work together. but i also know in looking at the proposal that the s
sharif come in, there's a reinvolving door act, and he returns to power in 1993. wins the election. my father returns to pakistan. >> is he welcomed by your aunt? >> arrested at the airport,s plane -- >> welcomedded in a manner of speaking. >> welcomed as -- as they react to each other, but, anyway, he is arrested at the airport on all the scharnlgs held over from the last period and taken to jail, again, all charges that carry the death penalty, charges of treason. one by one, the cases against him are acquitted in them. , and he comes out of jail, and he starts to travel around the country. he founds a reformed movement, an elected member of the prudential assembly. in quite early on in the regime, she empowers the security forces in the city, and under operation clean up to, quote, clean up the city, and what that means, really is it means whatever the security forces would like it to mean. in the two-year period it's in effect, some 3,000 men are murdered, and in what we call police encounters, which is, you know, a flagrant abuse of language because encounter is what happens when
through. we are watching, those of us to our american, 1960 election, nixon kennedy. there was the first sign of the dollar crisis. kennedy has a pledge that he would not allow the dollar to exceed value during the course of that campaign. you went through the 60's with this dollar crisis. there is now a glut of dollars with the recovery of japan and germany, all these exports. it didn't know what to do. there was pressure, as there is now coming from germany for austerity and other countries in europe. there was pressure for austerity on the united states in order to stabilize the value of the dollar, especially given its rolls. this was crucial. and the americans did not know quite what to do. then made an attempt in 1979. first in 1970. an enormous strike with in 1970, and those high interest rates caused wall street crisis, the commercial paper prices, penn central and other. goldman got into trouble than for selling bonds for full value. and so they pulled back. the policies, ranging price controls. and it wasn't until finally and again under pressure from the germans in particular,
is relentlessly negative, but it comes at an interesting moment both for iran, which has apartmently elections next june, typically during periods of time when there is that democratic process. there's even greater and international scrutiny on iran's human rights record. trying to prevent the iranian nuclear program from arriving at the point where they're actually able to produce a weapon, and how you tie an antiproliferation policy with a human rights policy is an issue that is often been difficult for policymakers to reconcile. so, why don't i quickly just open it up. maybe i'll start with marina, since your experience at this is so personal, and maybe ask you just on a very basic level whether you think life for ordinary iranians has gotten better or worse? the last few years, and just give us a kind of -- your best sense of what the human rights landscape looks like today versus, say, five years ago or a decade ago. >> well, i guess this all depends on how much people know here about how bad, the absolute disregard for human rights iran is in general. i don't know how much you know actua
the last presidential election results, there's this desire for different multiple centers of power. so the task here in washington is going to be very difficult to convince her u.s. government to change the way it has done business for 30 years because a lot of the strategic and current imperatives drive our security. how do you actually play the right role of engaging your? it's not naÏvely giving money to liberal groups and things like this are not having a strategy. i do believe that this is a significant test inside of egypt. it's an encouraging sign, and i think, this is my prediction and were rob and others may disagree, is that it's going to force islamist political parties at least elements of the to change their ideology, if the system remains open and that's the big if, if there's a big debate i don't see it going backwards in terms of the diversity we see in egypt as large as it is it's hard for me to imagine that going backwards. >> okay, we are going to move to our closing remarks and we're going to go in reverse order, so bret, you can have two minutes to make a final pl
notable books elections visit booktv's website booktv.org or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> up next, author, dr. and u.s. senator tom coburn, acclaimed author of breach of trust, talks about long-term deficit reduction, health care, the future of the republican party and more. .. >> guest: that he could not raise the adequate amount of wheat that he wanted to. because the government had decided they were going to control wheat plantings. and so what he said was, okay, then i can raise wheat for my chickens. and he took it all the way to the supreme court and lost that battle. >> host: why do you recount that story in "the debt bomb"? >> guest: because it's a great example on the enumerated powers and the unwinding -- why do we find ourself in the place we're in now? how'd we get here, what do by -- we do about it, and what are the ramifications? the greatest way for the government to make something expensive is for the government to make it affordable. and all you have to do is look at the programs. what were the average inflationary costs of health care before we created medic
duly elected leadership are built on more stable foundation this can be substantial but brutal ties the u.s. maintains with the hosni mubarak regime in egypt or yemen. nowhere in the region is the struggle against dictatorship more vital than in syria. over the past 20 months it has become abundantly clear that with assad in power there is no possibility, none whatever, for democratic process in syria. for years syria has been one of the most repressive countries in the world according to the state department rights reports, analytical studies by freedom house. political dissidents were routinely in prisons or disappeared and journalists were silenced. human-rights activists operated underground living in constant fear of the dreaded -- mr reuel marc gerecht 23 -- assad was cast by many as a, quote, reformer but his terrible treatment of his own people should have been a strong indication of what he was really all about. callie government treats its people the true testament to its character. callie government treats its own people in vindication of how it will act on the world stag
every day is election day. and campaigning and elections make for uncompromising line sets. you stand on your principles to mobilize your base, draw in endless amounts now of money. the 24 / seven news cycle covers politics as if it is a horse race in the horses are on steroids in this terrorist of the money is coming in to fund the campaign. so what we mean by the uncompromising mindset is a mindset that is geared toward elections and not toward governing. >> you right in this by you and your co-authored, as we observe the changing scene in american politics we came to believe that the general problem could be addressed by concentrating on a particular institution, the united states congress. >> well, if you wanted the problem with the uncompromising mine says, look no further than the congress, the 100th of congress in washington. gridlock, nothing gets passed. the least of legislation and the last 50 years. why? because everybody is campaigning all the time. there is very little by way of relationships across the aisle. and we went out to the brink of the debt ceiling crisis before
possible. we had a great partnership this year, including conventions, election night, and so we're very, very excited to be ail to bring these substantive conversations about the most important issues driving washington to you, thanks to the bank of america. thank you, john, and thank you to your colleagues. you may have gotten cards. we'll be bringing you into the conversation, think about what you're going to ask. without further adieu, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward? [applause] >> thank you. saving seats with my notes. i'll pick those up. >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> okay, thank you, thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has become a best seller, as all your books do, looked at the last cliff negotiations over the previous grand bargain that didn't quite get over the finish line. what does that teach us about the current cliff negotiations? >> well, it's ground hog day. the question who is playing bill murray? i mean such a repetition. it's the same players at the same seats at the table with the same doctrines, and, so, you know, where th
, despite the fear, it's not going to change one election here in the senate. it's not going to decide one of the primaries that i fear are distorting the politics of our country. but you know what, mr. president? it will decide whether some people live or die in another country, where there is no accountability and only united states values and standards are the difference to the prospects of someone with a disability. in some countries, children are disposed of, killed because they have a disability. our treaty can actually help prevent that. in some countries, children do not get to go to school and certainly have no prospects of a future simply because they are born with a disability. this treaty will help offer hope where there is none. the united states could actually sit at the table and make the difference for people with disabilities because we're willing to push our values and hold other nations accountable to meet our standards, the gold standard of the americans with disabilities act. mr. president, i'd ask just for another three minutes, please. the presiding officer: without
to stress the need for elected officials to act. for not only has the passage of time exacerbated some of the economic problems, it has revealed a perhaps equally-dangerous political one. our inability to grapple with pressing fiscal challenges represents nothing less than a crisis in our democratic order. compounding the instability and unpredictability in a volatile world. our propositions for this coalition are simple. the national security of the united states depends on its economic health. that health must be insured by averting the immediate crises and by laying the groundwork for a rigorous, long-term program of debt reduction, smart investment, economic growth and lower income inequality. in national security spending, we can target investments much more efficiently in response to threats that are evolving before our eyes. and resources need to be shifted toward nonmilitary elements of our national security posture. in the immediate term -- and by that i mean over the next four weeks -- we must avoid driving our country over the fiscal cliff. no partisan ideology is worth the
of the child standard misstating an election concert in children with disabilities come in the best interest of the child shall be a primary consideration. we all want to support the best interest of the child, every child. but i and my constituents including those who home school their children or send their children to private or religious schools have justifiable doubts that a foreign u.n. body, a committee operating under geneva, switzerland should decide what is in the best interest of the child at home with his or her parents in utah or any other state in our great union. article for this treaty obligates the united states to recognize economic, social and cultural entitlements is rights under domestic u.s. law. the senate is my opinion has not adequately investigated how the standard will affect domestic u.s. federal and state law. we have had one hearing on this issue that included both opponents and opponents of the treaty but did not substantively address my concerns about the standard, about the significant addition to what would become the law of the land of the united states of
that president was in cambodia right after the election. he was in burma. secretary clinton moved widely throughout the region as does secretary panetta. and the amount of activities that i do and my forces do have been a prompt jump in what we've done in the past, and we're looking for opportunities to do more exercise. we're doing more of those things already. i think it's visible to our allies. i think it's visible to our partners. not to be invisible to the region. we also want to jump, where's the next summary our aircraft carrier, that's always the sake of. and we will, over time as you heard secretary panetta said, we will rebalance our navy towards the pacific, and i party mentioned in my opening remarks, we are rapidly moving our most capable assets in the region because of some of the ballistic missile defense will be facing of those types of things. so i think it's not about one thing. it's about a holistic approach, and what if you on the military side is only one aspect of a. it's got to be tied to what's happening in the economic side in what's happening in the diplomatic s
wield in the next election rather than to join together in a bipartisan basis and solve what's broken in our immigration system. let's start here, let's build on this. we can do it today if we can just somehow avoid the objections and to pass this legislation that's been passed by the house. it passes the stem visa bill, it keeps families together, it represents values that i would think both sides of the aisle would applaud. with that, mr. president, i would yield the floor and suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: mrs. murray: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: i ask unanimous consent the quorum call be lifted. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. murray: thank you, mr. president. mr. president, middle-class families in our country today are paying very close attention to what we are doing here in washington, d.c. they really understand what is at stake. they know that the impact our decisions will have on their lives, and they keep hoping that their elect
. >> in a few days after the election when republicans vote didn't have the president has been disbanded voters like a 44-point gap. right away they said we need to do something aggressive on immigration. but it wasn't a couple weeks. republicans already couldn't agree on what needs to be done. how do you get your own party on the same page, devout democrats? >> i disagree. i don't think that's it's happening. what happens is the concept of immigration reform is one of consensus on the details of immigration reform with every major piece of legislation. we have millions of people who come here illegally. a lot of them come to me and say we've done it the right way and we didn't pay the fees, the churchgoing may somehow affecting the legally legally it would have been faster? it didn't seem right, so people are troubled by it. that's one example of one debate we will have. there's going to be invited to bid in the democratic party. as labor unions i'm in favor of a guestworker program. they will have an internal party debates. there's no magic solution. it's important to do and i believe we can.
served across eight presidential administrations and formed the coalition to stress the need for elected officials to act. not only has the passage of time exacerbated some of the economic problems, it is revealed perhaps equally political. our inability to grapple with the pressing fiscal to the just represents nothing less than dhaka crisis in our space order. compounding the instability and unpredictability in a volatile world. ever proposition is simple. the national security in the united states depends on its economic health. that must be ensured by averting the immediate crisis, and by laying the ground short for the rigorous long-term program of the debt reduction, smart investment, economic growth, and lower income inequality. in the national security spending, we can target investments much more efficiently than response to threats that are evolving before our eyes. and resources need to be shifted towards them on military elements of the national security posture. in the immediate term, and by that i mean over the next four weeks, we must avoid driving the country over the fis
in this country, was the mayor of albany. he had an interrupted success from the time he was elected 1942 until he died in hospital in 1983, 11 terms uninterrupted, and that's the longest running mayor of any city in the united states, and he was very proud of that. he was part of this fantastic political machine, which took power away from the republicans in 1921. and a key figure in that was an irish dan o'connell, there were four oh connell brothers and a couple of corning brothers, his father was one of them. and they found the new democratic party and they took the city back from the republicans had run it since 1899. and when they took it in 1921, they never let go. it's still in power. succession has been on through the death of the two people who was the key, perpetuators of the machine. dan o'connell died in 1957, and erasmus six years later. and after that came tommy whelan who was appointed, chosen as, successor by corning, and then now jerry jennings succeeded tommy whelan who died, and served for 10 years and then quit and then he was succeeded in a primary, and that was unheard of be
. [laughter] >> greg, over here in -- >> in the last election, it seemed as though many of our candidates had a tin ear and didn't understand the constituents that they were speaking to. made blunders that were exaggerated and amplified by the media. >> right. >> nonetheless, blunders. how can we get our candidates to at least understand hip if not be hip? >> you know what? i would argue that they don't necessarily have to be hip. i don't think ronald reagan was hip. you know what's funny, if people talk about ronald ray began to this day -- reagan to this day of how conservative he was, he raised taxes, this and that, but for some reason he exemplified what was special about the american idea. and i do think that, i mean, no one would ever describe ronald reagan as hip, but he could articulate something that nobody else could. i had a strong feeling that mitt was getting there after the first debate, and i saw it when he said that one line like i've been doing this for 25 years, and i have no idea what you're talking about. [laughter] [applause] like, whoa, that was an amazing line. his mist
them to pass so the end of january it does not wash as well or if elected as we say it does, but we know that it does, it have our hands on it all up date on it and you will swear by bees in the back. he will join the club because we have collector after collector every single year who does collect every single one of these we would love for you to join the family. >>guest: as big as they are they can be throws, comforters, you can throw them on your i your lounge area you can hang them up as a mural on the back of film and you always have a huge base that we are trying to cover up and at our favorite team. night until they hold all with the mayor and you get the trade of there's so many uses for this reason: back to the number one use, and soft, alter flesh, as this of the key factors when you are looking for throws that you can bring to the game the winter months are here the playoff tickets will be and you do have to bring that throws to the games because this will be freezing especially if you are a green bay fan, i'd you are trying to get the home playoff game. if your home
it is destined to be which is the single greatest nation. >> a few days after the election when republicans lifted -- mitt romney with hispanic voters, something like a 44-point gap. we need to do something on immigration. but it wasn't a couple weeks. republicans already couldn't agree on what needs to be done. how do you get your own party on the same page, let alone with the democrats did was i disagree but i don't think that's what's happened. i think what's happening is, the concept of immigration reform, and a lot of consensus. like every major piece of legislation to need to be examined. i'll give you an example. we have millions waiting to come in legally. a lot of encouragement office. they say we've done it the right way, we've waited. you were telling me that somehow if i can elegantly it would have been faster? it doesn't seem rights of people are troubled by the. that's one example of the kind of debate i think we're going to have. on the ag worker, ma guestworker, there will be a lot of debate in the democratic party. they are our labor workers who are not in favor of a guestw
focusing on nonfiction elections. these nonfiction titles were included in the new york times 100 notable books of 2012. and barack obama:the story david maraniss, associate editor of the washington post present a history of president barack obama's family. charles murray of the american enterprise institute argues a growing divide between the upper and lower class goes beyond economics differences in coming apart:the state of white america 1960-2010. in victory, the triumphant game revolution, linda hirschman presenting history of the gay-rights movement. david nassau chronicles the life and career of the father of the kennedy political dynasty in the patriarch, remarkable life and turbulent times of joseph kennedy. history professor at duke university examined haiti from its founding to today in haiti:the aftershock of history. for an extended list of links to publications, 2012 notable books election visit booktv website booktv.org or our facebook page facebook.com/booktv. >> next, norman finkelstein argues the support of your by liberal american jews is declining by overwhelming evide
are living in tents. we have, you know, there havetht been elections and we have a ne government and so and a lot of aid that has been promised has not been going out. people have individual effortsro have some ways carried the day, you know, people have pickedw, n themselves up with the best in the best ways they can. it is a question that we have to keep asking and it's something that we have not allow people to forget that for example, hurricane sandy went through haiti and people in the northeast now have a sense what it wase like.ple, imagine something like thaticane going through your neighborhood, your city when you're living in a tent. there's something like 74,000th acre or more of land that hashe been the harvest, you know. more problems ahead that have grown as a result of the earth spooking, if you will, with the hurricane. you have more food insecurity. a number of cholera cases have increased with hurricane sandy. we're dealing and people tend to forget we are -- canceling canceling with urgent and difficult situation in haiti. >> where did "so spoke the earth: the haiti i
signature election a week she will feature brand new items including great tops, late teens, and to hand back and she always brings us great in fashions at a great price and you can check out our entire line all day long+ going to hsn.comtype in key word serena williams. [commercial] [commercial] [reading] [♪ music ♪] [♪ music ♪] >>host: i am so excited and i have to be calmed. coming up in 36 minutes, we are going to be sharing, i one of the most exciting deliberate today's specials and this is a quintessential gifthusbands, that some of you want to give her a diamond earrings but you don't want to spend a fortune this is herkimer courts it were in the world can you get a deb guyot design like this there the greatest value i have ever seen in my entire life. it will be very exciting and it is coming up at midnight, you have seen my beautiful female colleagues wearing and everybody was very excited so i do hope you are ready because i do what you and i hope you can get one pair of the normally herkimer earrings between $119.220 $9 but we have never seen herkimer at this price l
is stay involved, stay informed and to make sure those elected into public office understand. [applause] >> have you perceive any difference in the way he's being treated -- [inaudible] >> i have not. i think bradley is treated professionally. the military court-martial is in my opinion the best courtroom to go into, both state and federal. i know anyone who doesn't have experience with the military system may view it with suspicious eyes. but from my days, it is by far the best courtroom for bradley to be in. >> had your experiences in the military and civilian life form how you approach court-martials generally? and this case specifically. >> that is what i was just saying. a lot of people would look at the military and say, this seems to be very important. you have an office there and enlisted taipan i'll come if you go with the panel selected by the person whose been court-martialed. you have a military judge that is in the military and there's some suspicion that person may be subject to some influence. so when you look at it from the outside, you can see and perhaps think the syst
would note that the president was in cam cambodia after the election, and then he was in burma, and secretary clinton moves throughout the region as well as secretary panetta, and the amount of activities i do and my forces do is a prompt jump than what we did in the past, and we're looking for opportunities to do more exercise. we are doing more of those things already, and that's viz l to the allies. i think it's visible to the partners, and i feel it visible to the region. we oftenment to jump to, well, where's the next aircraft carry your or the submarine. that's the signal. we will, over time, as you've heard secretary panetta say, rebalance towards the pacific, and i mentioned opening remarks. we're rapidly moving the most capable assets into the region because of the ballistic missile defense threats we face and those things, so it's about a holistic approach, and what i do on the military side is just one aspect of it. it's got to be tie into the economic side, what's happening in the diplomatic side, and so we're working hard that accomplishes this strategy. >> a quick
time in this city was the may i don't have of albany. he had great success from the time he was elected in 1942 until he died in the hospital of emphysema in 1983. eleven terms, uninterrupted. and he -- that's the longest-running mayor of any si city in the united states. and he was very proud of that achievement. he was part of this fantastic political machine which took power away from the republicans in 1921. and the key figure in that was an irishman, dan o'connell. there was four o'connell brothers, and there were a couple of corning brothers. they founded the new democratic party, and they took the city back from the republicans that had run it since 1899. and when they took it in 1921, they never let go. it's still in power. the succession has been on through the deaths of the two people who were the key perpetuators of the machine. dan o'connell died in 1977 and his son ten years later, and after that came tommy wales who was chosen as successor, and now jerry jennings succeeded tommy whalen, who died, who served for ten years and then quit. and then he, he was succeeded in a pr
's. >> again, the november 2012 elections. >> that no one to talk about 2012. and tired of 2012. less talk about the future. 2012 was a very difference. were going to have to figure out a way to appeal to a bitter electorate. >> a year running for president? >> that is classified. your parents is not high enough to your hat. i wouldn't -- want to be part of the national debate. >> government bullies, the second book by senator rand paul, however day americans are being harassed and abused by an imprisoned by the fed's. >> now on book tv a history of the american revolution with the focus on the middle colonies. new york, new jersey, and portions of pennsylvania. the author recalls the importance of the region during the war and visits several sites to document their historical significance and it plans date today. from washington's crossing of the dollar to the battle of brooklyn, it is about an hour and 15. [applause] >> this subtitle of this book is old irishman. it is a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known to geniuses in my life. one is d
. they just haven't elected to before. that's not the case. it's very clear in senate rules if you challenge a ruling constitutional, that challenge is debatable and the debate itself can be filibustered. but what they're going to have to get in this case, senator calls for a point of order suggesting the filibusters unconstitutional. is ignore the parliamentarian who will say can be debated and steamrolled over the parliamentarian and basically break their own rules by not allowing debate. ornstein also argued quote basically the essential character of the senate in the system, the republican form of democracy trying to avoid the emotions of the majority is to provide some outlet for minorities. change than come you can really do, i'm sorry. change that and you would be moved to the potential of tyranny to the majority. there'll always be a president of the lies the congressional leader. that temptation to overrule will always be there. it is there today. what harry reid is trying to do is wrong. if the only way for conservatism is to fight back is engage in a fight. if he is going to push
over 11 million customers in the united states. over the past four years and into the recent election, the issue of health care has been at the center of our nation's great policy debate and implications beyond the health care industry impacting our larger fiscal policy and important social concerns. we are fortunate to have a test today mr. broussard insights on the industry in developing policy. prior to joining humana 2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to your comments today. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you. well, thank you. i really appreciate the opportunity from each one of you. our nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transform
for equal treatment of maternity in health insurance. as you all know we face an election in which one party vowed to repeal even modest gains for equality in health coverage. the fight for health security in the united states is far from over. all other affluent nations agreed long ago that basic health care should be a right of all citizens the u.s. continues to treat medical care as a product purchased in the marketplace. even now the most sweeping reform in our history embodies tension between the rights of the people and the rights of private companies and individuals to profit from the health care system. the three women i described in this talk with the different times in different parts of the country. they didn't know each other and never heard of each other. what all three of them had in common was the belief that ordinary citizens could take the lead in preventing a new vision of what the health care system could be. all three of them felt the affordable care despite its flaws, continuing open end participatory national debate about how the american health-care system can best ser
friends and their teams is that about flu flannelet and who is to elect and the ferris may not a tip. i was still peart be in paris and here. --rs >>host: and everybody gets a chance to have fun and it is a playful way to really have a great time. now tim to boa's gone and he is taking over this city and the team. >>host: what is great, there is probably now a lot of new displaced broncos think people are die-hard peyton manning fans have indianapolis' resistance needs to start shopping for broncos scared. >>guest: the broncos are one of the favorites they're ready have a lot of great players come and receivers and when you have peyton manning and someone was playing that good former and cp he may be the-- huge win today and it's been a weak division but they have been able to keep it out. >>host: do get worried that the injury, did you think that they be heard as a legacy for his days were done does everybody start a new season, often crisscross than knowing how it is going to go? >>guest: you watch. manning and the way that he talks about his prior you are not really sure. h
and france elected to retake the canal by force of arms and enlisted israel's help in that effort. israel sought an alliance of convenience between britain and france and herself and launched this war. >> i want to show on this map here where the lines -- the diagonal lines, one at the bottom is sinai. over here is the gulf of suez. for the audience to look around and see where jordan is located. jordan used to control that area in the middle of israel which is the west bank. then you have syria at the top and lebanon. 1956 war lasted how long? >> well, for the british and french, it lasted about three days. the israelis it continued a little bit longer, about three, four days because israel started it. the invasion of the suez canal occurred on november 3 or 4 and israel launched their attack on the 29th of october. >> who led the country then? >> david was the prime minister. >> where were people like ariel sharon? were they involved? >> ariel sharon was involved in a very controversial action. this gets complicated, right. as part of the deal with britain and france and israel, israel
dissent and as a result you could argue that the election of 1800 which is more scandal, more scandalous than any ad we will see tonight during the next seven days or whatever. the two warring parties that he is held down for so long finally go after each other. washington is a different guy in this presidency. he changes, as you say we all do. he leads the army out to pennsylvania to get these guys who are rebellious. they don't want to pay the whiskey tax. hamilton has figured out -- >> its attacks on grain by the way. >> the excess grain that farmers use after they have barely pay their rent, they are in pittsburgh and western pennsylvania, i'll pass carlisle but anyway they are paying rent back to the east on their land and they are barely making any money and all of a sudden they have got this opportunity to make money with it excess grain and so whiskey and then they will be taxed on it. basically there is an argument made by bill hoagland whose book, founding fathers, they are drinking whiskey there at the reading. he writes about this and i used him. basically the idea is that ha
of the administration in the first 18 months. some of it may have been this acute year in advance of the election that some transparency initiative was going to put out some-affirmation that would cost the president the white house. hopefully that will have abated, but i think reporters are concerned that by the same token with the president having another four years there is no particular reason for him to be concerned about the complaint either from the press or transparency advocates about things that are not quite right within the administration i think you would find the same dynamic in the other areas where we want to see data published , such as the regulation to legislation performance and judicial documents. >> moving off of that a little bit. the previous question. replacing a lot of blame at the administration. the irresponsibility. a piece of it seems to be with congress. congress has an oversight role to make sure that these initiatives are functioning and that other initiatives should be taking them are started in seen through. at least is congress playing the appropriate role in ma
, and it did not do it. this proposal is there, the study is there. spoken to the elected officials and city managers. there ready to go. all we need is funding. already authorized. and there are other projects as well. cells are s.i. and rockaway. so this concept referred to accelerate to construction is what new york news now. we estimate the amount of money is about $502 billion for these seven projects. no red tape, no study. it has been studied. community support in every one of them. we will put that in the supplemental bill, but obviously her committee will review. why do we needed now? because in some of our most badly damaged areas, south shore, s.i., because suffolk county, you have no protection. a minor storm could come flood again. we have to move quickly. in some cases they wanted to build seawalls, some rock armor, some defense systems. along the coast like bees as s.i. where search is over 10 feet came in. and in other coastal areas, coney island, rockaways, some of the projects were partially built but then there was no funding, and that ended. now, here is the good news. we
on electing and neutralizing i were aiming -- activities and financial technology transfer sectors in the region, cooperative with the western and other allies. uphold the interests of small south caucasus countries when attempting to construct an effective iran policies, which leads to elimination of tehran's nuclear weapons program, sustained energy projects and help european countries and diversifying their energy, by connecting them to energy resources of the caspian sea in central asia region, and specifically we should support and help turkey and azerbaijan, and europe, finalize in the baku project. .. >> for if we continue to neglect the caucuses, this neglect will quickly become maligned, and maligned neglect invariably generates not only instability, but also protected violence. by its aggressive action, iran is endangering the fragile equilibrium in the strategically-sensitive region which is important for the u.s. interests. america should remain vigilant to deter violence, extremism and terrorism practiced by the islamic republic against america's friends and allies in
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